Where does Sen. Doug Jones stand on the issues?

Senatordougjonestransition.com

WASHINGTON (Sinclair Broadcast Group) -- Doug Jones has officially been sworn in as Alabama's next Senator after a surprise win over Republican candidate Roy Moore during a special election last December.

Jones said during his victory speech that the biggest issues facing the nation included health care, jobs and the economy.

"This campaign has been about common courtesy and decency and making sure everyone in this state, regardless of which ZIP code you live in, is going to get a fair shake in life," Jones said.

But where does the newest representative in Congress stand on these various issues? Here is a review of what he told voters during his campaign to be elected.

Health care and abortion

Jones believes in keeping the Affordable Health Care Act as it is right now. He says he believes health care is a right, not a privilege "limited to the wealthy and those with jobs that provide coverage," according to his campaign website. Although he does disagree with Bernie Sanders' solution to solving health care - the single payer system.

"I'm not there on universal health care like that or Medicare for all. I do favor a public option for health care but I need to look at those numbers," Jones said during an MSNBC interview with Chuck Todd. "That's going to be an expensive proposition. But that is one of a number of issues that need to be on the table."

He is also pro-abortion and believes that women should not be denied coverage due to the religious beliefs of the woman's employer. Despite his belief in allowing abortions, he is in agreement that late-term procedures should not be allowed.

When he spoke to AL.com, he said, "having said that, the law for decades has been that late-term procedures are generally restricted except in the case of medical necessity. That's what I support. I don't see any changes in that. It is a personal decision."

Taxes and the economy

Jones isn't optimistic about the Republican tax bill that was passed by Congress in December. After Jones' win, Democrats tried to convince Republicans to hold off on a vote for the tax bill until Jones was seated. Tax cuts for the wealthy in particular have held him back from fully supporting the legislation.

"I don't think the wealthy need a tax cut, I think we are in a position right now where we need to look at some tax issues," Jones said. "I want to make sure that the working class people of this state, the middle class are taken care of. I don't necessarily believe that's going to be a tax cut for the wealthy. I think people in this state understand that trickle down tax cuts just don't work."

Gun Control

Jones calls himself a second amendment person who owns guns and loves to hunt.

"We've got limitations on the second amendment right now. We've got limitations on all constitutional amendments in one form or another. I want to enforce the laws that we have right now," Jones told MSNBC back in September. "We need to make sure we shore up the National Crime Information System....to keep guns out of the hands of criminals and at the same time cut down on error so that law abiding citizens can get those."

Working with President Trump

Jones told MSNBC's Chuck Todd that if there are issues that the President needs to be addressed, he'll have no problem of speaking with him.

"I'm the kind of person that can work with anybody. I think that's going to be the hallmark of what I bring to this table," Jones said. "I can work with the President. I can work with any member of Congress or the Senate to try to do what's best....what I believe to be for the state of Alabama."

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