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Nevada faces controversy with first planned execution in 11 years

Nevada faces controversy with first planned execution in 11 years

Nevada is set to execute a person on death row for the first time in 11 years. And it plans to use controversial drugs to do it.

Scott Raymond Dozier, 46, murdered and dismembered two people, one in Las Vegas and one in Phoenix. He was sentenced to death in 2007. Dozier recently told the court to drop all appeals and move ahead with the execution. He's not deterred by the controversial drugs that are set to end his life.

"If they tell me, listen, there's a good chance it's going to be a real miserable experience for you for the two hours before you actually expire, I'm still going to do it," Dozier said at an August 17 court date.

Dozier is scheduled to be executed on November 14, 2017 at 8 p.m. at the new death chamber inside the Ely State Prison.

Documents show that at the end of May, the Department of Corrections ordered three drugs for the execution: Cisatracurium to cause paralysis, Diazepam to cause unconsciousness and the opioid Fentanyl, with is a strong painkiller. The cost for all three drugs was nearly $800.

"We're looking at whether or not they're violating any kind of state and federal laws," said Holly Welborn the Nevada American Civil Liberties Union Policy Director.

The Nevada ACLU is concerned that the lethal combination has never been used anywhere in the country for an execution. The ACLU said Dozier will be a legal guinea pig for future executions.

"Paralytics have been known to cause suffocation and to lead to conscious sort of pain and torture if they're not used correctly," Welborn said.

Welborn said the Department of Corrections has not been transparent about the execution.

"If the state of Nevada is going to institute a new execution protocol, it needs to be a transparent process. It's going to affect more than just Mr. Dozier. It's going to affect all individuals that are on death row currently," she said. "We're looking at whether or not they're violating any kind of state and federal laws, and we're not going to know that until they release this protocol in its entirety."

Brooke Keast said nobody from the department would do an on-camera interview, citing pending litigation.

The ACLU does not have an appeal currently in the courts, but it is looking at all legal options to stop the execution.

"We have to make sure that any kind of drugs that are being used do not cause pain and torture, that's what the constitution requires," Welborn said.

A hearing is scheduled for September 11, when the Nevada Attorney General is expected to turn over paperwork explaining the execution protocol. But they don't want it made public, saying it's a security issue for the prison.

There are currently 82 inmates on death row in Nevada.


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